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brother goats

Brothers in Arms



Two adolescent pronghorn touch horns seemingly conversing through this ritual. Pronghorn are found throughout Utah, Nevada, Colorado and Montana. A relic from the Ice Age, they are the fastest animal in North America and one of the fastest in the world.


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Brown Eyed Girl

Brown Eyed Girl



Look into the eyes of a timber wolf, in there lurks a world far older and wiser than our own. This same wisdom has helped the wolf play the role of consummate predator. Giving balance to the ecosystem, wolves have played an important part in the evolution of such species as bison, elk, deer and pronghorn. As an ecologist once remarked, “The role of the wolf in the scheme of things, is to keep the legs of the deer swift.”


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Cathedral Rains

Cathedral Rains



Summers in Grand Teton National Park often bring afternoon thundershowers and lightning storms. This unique view shows the beauty of the seasonal rain as it drapes over the Cathedral group of mountains. The Cathedral Group refers to the mountains found in the Teton range - Grand Teton, Mount Owen, Middle Teton, South Teton, Teewinot Mountain, Teepe Pillar, Cloudveil Dome, Nez Perce Peak and Buck Mountain.


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Cathedral Rains

Day Dreamer



A grizzly bear takes a moment of pause in his daily routine to dream of his next hearty meal. Bears have long been a fascination for humans, perhaps because they have so many human-like qualities. Like us, they stand upright on the soles of their feet and have eyes facing nearly in the frontal plane. They seem to worry with moans and sighs, and court with obvious affection.


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Elks Club

Elks Club



Membership in this exclusive club is seasonal, short-lived and allows protection from predators for these bull elk. During the rutting season, the sound of bulls bugling fills the air, announcing their presence to potential rivals. Bulls expend a tremendous amount of energy during the rut in the attempt to gather harems, which leaves some bulls vulnerable to the approaching winter. As winter progresses, natural selection will claim the old and weak, leaving the stronger bulls to bugle another year.


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Emperor of Wyoming



A large bull moose surveys the landscape within Grand Teton National Park. Moose are found in the boreal and northern woodlands of North America. They are the largest member of the deer family. Bull moose can weigh up to 1,500 pounds and can run up to 35 mph.


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Free Bird

Free Bird



The American bison stands as an icon of the west, readily recognized as a symbol of a time that has past. Birds are attracted to bison because they eat the insects, mostly flies that are attracted to the bison. The relationship is a prime example of commensalism.


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Cathedral Rains

Jackson Lake Panoramic



Grand Teton National Park is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem, the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States. From sheltered river bottoms, to sage flats and mountain canyons, the Park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear and moose critical habitat to ensure their survival.


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Ladies Man

Ladies Man



A mule deer buck finds himself the object of attention between two does. Bucks expend a tremendous amount of energy during the rut in the attempt to secure breeding rights, which leaves some bucks vulnerable to the approaching winter. As winter progresses, natural selection will claim the old and weak, leaving the stronger animals to perpetuate the species.


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Made in Wyoming

Made in Wyoming



Two grizzly cubs sit at the feet of their mother as she watches over them. Humans have worshipped the bear from a time older than memory. Perhaps this fascination comes from the bear's humanlike qualities. They seem to worry with moans and sighs and court with obvious affection. Bears also snore in their sleep, teach, play, spank their children, are avid for sweets and have a moody, gruff and morose side.


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Native Son

Native Son



The American bison stands as an icon of the west, readily recognized as a symbol of a time that has past. Bison are able to withstand sub-zero temperatures for weeks at a time. They use their massive shoulder hump as a tool, enabling them to use their heads to move snow away from their winter forage.  Bull bison can weigh up to a ton and can travel to speeds of 35 mph.


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Nomad

Nomad



The term lone wolf represents one who separates oneself from the pack. A rarity in our vernacular when it come to thinking of how wolves travel and live. The wolf plays the role of consummate predator. Giving balance to the ecosystem, wolves have played an important part in the evolution of such species as bison, elk, deer and pronghorn. As an ecologist once remarked, "The role fo the wolf in the scheme of things, is to keep the legs of the deer swift."


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Northbound

Northbound



This adult grizzly bear boar traverses the winter landscape searching for food as he prepares for the long winter. Inland brown bears, or grizzly bears as they are commonly known, live throughout Grand Teton National Park, but can be elusive. They demand their space to roam freely without human interference.


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Old Man Winter

Old Man Winter



If there ever was a portrait of old man winter in animal form, this is it. This bison seemingly poses for his portrait of winter fortitude demonstrating his hearty nature. Bison are able to withstand sub-zero temperatures for weeks at a time. They use their massive shoulder hump as a tool, enabling them to use their heads to move snow away from their winter forage. This makes them masters of snow and ice able to survive the harsh winter months of Yellowstone.


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Peacemaker

Peacemaker



Hunted to the brink of extinction in the lower 48 states during the early 1900's, attitudes towards wolves are now changing due to the recognition of their integral ecological role as predators. Due to conservation efforts, many packs now call the Yellowstone area home.


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Rolling Thunder

Rolling Thunder



A bison herd roams the plains as they did once upon a time on the bountiful plains of the United States. In less than one hundred years, wholesale slaughter reduced the number of bison from an estimated high of sixty million to around three hundred animals. These remaining bison found refuge in Yellowstone National Park. Now thousands of them roam the Yellowstone ecosystem.


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Running Elk

Running Elk



This majestic bull elk strikes a picture-postcard pose as he crosses the landscape in Grand Teton National Park. The name is reminiscent of the Native American culture that is so prevalent within the folklore of the west. The sepia tone treatment on the image is a call back to old west times, when photographs were produced with tints including cuttlefish ink.


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Runs with Birds

Runs with Birds



A painted horse leads the herd and kicks up clouds of dust along the way. At his hooves, birds fly along in search of insects that are unearthed by the horses. Birds often travel along with the horses in their search for food. The horse has long been an icon of the American west and has been a strong ally to the rancher and settlers of the west. The name is reminiscent of the Native American culture that is so prevalent within the folklore of the west.


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Sage Runners

Sage Runners



The horse has long been an icon of the West. Along with the fascination of the American cowboy and the open range of the west, horses have been a coveted asset to ranching and transportation. These running horses show the beauty and grace of this animal.


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Sepia Barn

Sepia Barn



This antiquated barn reminds us of the history of the early settlers in the Jackson Hole area. Located inside Grand Teton National Park, the barn is a favored icon among the many visitors to the area. The Park is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem, the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States.  


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Sepia Horses

Sepia Horses



The horse has long been an icon of the West. Along with the fascination of the American cowboy and the open range of the west, horses have been a coveted asset to ranching and transportation. These running horses show the beauty and grace of this animal.


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Sepia Moose

Sepia Moose



A bull moose glides through waterlilies in a pond where he has staked out his territory for the annual autumn rut. Found in the boreal and northern woodlands of North America, moose are the largest member of the deer family. Bull moose can weigh up to 1,500 pounds and can run up to 35mph. During the mating season, moose have been known to challenge oncoming vehicles and even trains in defense of their females and their territories.


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Sink or Swim

Sink or Swim



As this bison crosses the high level of the stream, he exists innately between sinking and swimming. To brave such deep waters, there must be something very important on the other side that needs his attention. Bison are a common animal within the confines of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.


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Snake River Overlook Pano

Snake River Overlook Sepia Panoramic


The Snake River Overlook is one of the scenic overlooks that you always remember from your visit to the Park. One of the most famous images that many photographers have captured is shown here in dramatic sepia tone detail.


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Snake River Overlook Vertical

Snake River Overlook Vertical



The Snake River Overlook is one of the scenic overlooks in the park that you always remember from your visit to Grand Teton National Park. One of the most famous images that many photographers have captured is shown here in dramatic monochromatic detail.


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Solitude

Solitude



The Teton Range rises above the Snake River Plain on a brutally cold winter morning. Winter mornings regularly reach below freezing temperatures. This image is from one of those mornings when it was a dreadfully cold -12 degrees.


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Standing Bear

Standing Bear



A brown bear boar stands to get a better view of his fishing hole. Humans have worshipped the bear from a time older than memory. Perhaps this fascination comes from the bear's humanlike qualities.  They seem to worry with moans and sighs and court with obvious affection.


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Talisman

Talisman



A lone bison poses against the backdrop of an approaching storm as he stands a talisman for a much needed rainstorm on the arid landscape. This iconic image combines old west imagery with the beauty of landscapes found throughout the west.


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The Lookout

The Lookout



A group of bison graze near a lone tree on the western plains. Yellowstone was home to the last, wild, free-roaming bison at the turn of the 19th century. In less than one hundred years, wholesale slaughter reduced the number of bison from an estimated high of sixty million to around three hundred animals.  These remaining bison found refuge in Yellowstone National Park.


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The Wild Bunch

The Wild Bunch



A large gathering of pronghorn, or antelope as many know them, group together for a family portrait.  Pronghorn are found throughout Utah, Nevada, Colorado, and Montana. While large numbers of pronghorn exist in the wild, it is rare to see them gather in a single group this large.


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Trails End

Trails End



A weathered, snow-caked bison emotes the weary, forlorn journey that bison face every year during the harsh winter months. Bison are able to withstand sub-zero temperatures for weeks at a time. They use their massive shoulder hump as a tool, enabling them to use their heads to move snow away from their winter forage.


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Usual Suspects

Usual Suspects



These wild roaming pronghorn line up side by side to view the comings and goings on their daily patrol. Pronghorn are found throughout Utah, Nevada, Colorado and Montana. A relic from the Ice Age, they are the fastest animal in North America and one of the fastest in the world.


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Wisdom

Wisdom



An American bison poses for a portrait with eyes reflecting the wisdom of ages in the American west. In less than one hundred years, wholesale slaughter reduced the number bison from an estimated high of sixty million to under three hundred animals. These remaining bison found refuge in Yellowstone National Park. Now thousands of these animals roam the Yellowstone ecosystem.


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Wish you were here

Wish You Were Here



In a scene from a vintage postcard, a lone bison walks the plains against a backdrop of the majestic Teton Range. This is one of the most memorable sights you may see when you visit the park. Bison are common residents of the park but such a scene is a special treat for lucky visitors.


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Wyoming Skies

Wyoming Skies



With the Teton Range as a backdrop, a herd of horses travels along the sagebrush plains. This scene is reminiscent of the old west when cowboys worked the land and a horse was a necessity for survival.


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Yoga Bear

Yoga Bear



A young grizzly frolics in the snow, apparently trying out a new yoga pose. Humans have worshipped the bear from a time older than memory. Perhaps this fascination comes from their humanlike qualities.  They seem to worry with moans and sighs and court with obvious affection. Bears also snore in their sleep, teach, play, spank their children, are avid for sweets and have a moody, gruff and morose side.


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CONTACT US
 info@graycranestudios.com

 307.690.9510

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Jackson Hole, WY  83001