Bears



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Bad Bear Day

Ever have one of those days? This black bear bides his time up a tree while a grizzly passes below. Black Bears live throughout most on North America from the northern temperate rain forests to the desert southwest, to the rolling hills of the eastern states.

 

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Chillin

A polar bear passes the time playing and rolling in the snow. Bears have an incredible capacity for play. As youngsters, play is vital in teaching the skills of hunting and survival, as well as establishing social order among family groups. Polar bears have been known to romp and carouse with the likes of arctic foxes and even sled dogs.

 

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Family Outing

A grizzly bear teaches her cubs the finer points of fishing by standing on top of a four foot falls and snatching fish out of the air while they try to jump the falls during the salmon run. This is a learned behavior and is only one of the many techniques that grizzly bears use for catching fish.

 

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Fast Food

A young grizzly is on the run after catching a salmon. Young bears are on the bottom of the totem pole when it comes to favorite fishing holes on the salmon streams. When they do catch a fish, they usually have to move off the stream to enjoy the catch. As the bear matures and increases in size, they will be able to enjoy better fishing opportunities.

 

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Lord Grizz

A large boar grizzly “bears” the wounds of a successful breeding season. Some male grizzly bears, like this one, can weigh in excess of 1,500 pounds and can live for 30 years or more. Humans have long been fascinated by bears, perhaps because they have so many human-like qualities. Like us, they stand upright on the soles of their feet and have eyes facing nearly in the frontal plane. They seem to worry with moans and sighs, and court with obvious affectio...

 

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Pushover

Humans have worshiped the bear from a time older than memory. Perhaps this fascination comes from the bear’s humanlike qualities. Like us, bears stand upright on the soles of their feet and have their eyes facing froward nearly in the frontal plane. They seem to worry with moans and sighs and court with obvious affection. Bears also snore in their sleep, teach, play, spank their children, are avid for sweets, and have a moody, gruff and morose side.

 

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Rain Bears

Three grizzly bear cubs wait patiently in the rain while their mother fishes nearby. Female grizzly bears can produce a litter of one to three cubs every three years. The majority of these cubs never reach adulthood. This low reproductive rate makes the grizzly bear highly sensitive to changes in its environment.

 

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Water Rites

Two Grizzly Bear sows give a mutual warning to keep away from each other’s cubs. These are usually short encounters, ending with little or no injury to the bears. These two females and their families find refuge in wilderness areas. There, they live and thrive on a diet of salmon, roots, insects, and berries. Content to be far away from the intrusions of humans, they have the space to be just what they are.

 

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