Tetons & Yellowstone



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12 Below

During the winter season in Grand Teton National Park, many mornings reach below freezing temperatures. This image is one of those mornings when it was a dreadfully cold -12 degrees below zero.

 

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Antelope Flats

Spring comes late to the sagebrush plain known as Antelope Flats in Grand Teton National Park. By the end of June, arrow leaf balsam, and showy gentian emerge, creating a colorful palette for the Teton mountain range. This area of the Park provides rich habitat for many species of wildlife. Large herds of bison now roam these areas along with pronghorn, moose, coyotes and even a few wolves.

 

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Autumn Along the Snake

The Fall season begins with the changing of colors in Grand Teton National Park. The Grand Teton mountain range is reflected in the Snake River to paint a beautiful fall scene.

 

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Autumn on the Oxbow

Mount Moran is refelected in the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park. The park is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem, which is the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States. From the sheltered river bottoms, to the sage flats and mountain canyons, Grand Teton National Park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear and moose needed habitat to ensure their survival.

 

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Crane Flats

Morning light paints the Grand Teton a beautiful pink hue in Grand Teton National Park. The park is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem, which is the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States. From the sheltered river bottoms, to the sage flats and mountain canyons, Grand Teton National Park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear and moose needed habitat to ensure their survival.

 

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Field of Dreams

A bison herd grazes among a spring bloom framed by the teton mountain range which is found in Grand Teton National Park, part of the Yellowstone ecosystem – the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States. From the sheltered river bottoms, to the sage flats and mountain canyons, Grand Teton National Park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear, moose and bison needed habitat to ensure their survival.

 

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Gold in the Air

The first rays of the sun paint the Grand Teton range a golden hue. This beautiful image is one of the many you may see as a visitor to the park if you are willing to brave the cold temperatures of the winter morning in the park.

 

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Home on the Range

Morning light casts a soft yellow glow on the Moulton Barn in Grand Teton National Park. This barn dates back to the late 1800s and is one of the most-visited spots inside the park.

 

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Misty Tetons

The seasons first heavy snowfall softens the view of the Tetons from String lake. These snows usually are a signal for Ungulates such as Elk & Moose to start moving to lower elevations where they will spend the winter having an easier time finding forage.

 

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Morning Calm

Located along the east shore of the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park, Schwabachers Landing is used by fisherman, canoeists and rafters to gain access to the Snake River. From the sheltered river bottoms, to the sage flats and mountain canyons, The park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear and moose needed habitat to ensure their survival.

 

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Old Faithful

Winter at Old Faithful offers a spectacular view of the geyser only a few hardy souls get to witness. Old Faithful is a cone geyser and is one of the most predictable geographical features on earth. Erupting almost every 91 minutes to a height of 185 feet.

 

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Rest Stop

A grouping of moose spend some down time and enjoy the view of the Grand Teton Mountain Range. Moose are found in the boreal and northern woodlands of North America. Moose are the largest member of the deer family. Bull moose can weigh up to 1,500 pounds and can run up to 35 mph. During the mating season, moose have even been known to challenge oncoming vehicles and trains in defense of their females and their territories.

 

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Snake River Overlook Pano

This spectacular view of the Teton Range and the Snake River is a favorite scenic spot in Grand Teton National Park. The park is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem, which is the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States. From the sheltered river bottoms, to the sage flats and mountain canyons, Grand Teton National Park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear and moose needed habitat to ensure their survival.

 

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Summers End

The turning of foilage from green to yellow signifies the changing of seasons from summer to fall within the confines of Grand Teton National Park. This beautiful image that captures the fading light of the day reminds us of the daily and seasonal renewal that we find in our natural world.

 

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Teton Safari

Evening light aided by a nearby forest fire creates a soft pastoral view of the Tetons, with a herd of Elk along with a few Bison. These "park" areas in Grand Teton National Park offer critical habitat for many species of wildlife.

 

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Teton Sunshine

Spring arrives a little later in the year at Grand Teton National Park with lower meadows blooming around the end of June and beginning of July. Some years it seems the whole valley are covered in flowers offering a boon to wildlife populations.

 

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Tetons & Lupine Pano

First light illuminates the Tetons and a field of lupines. Spring comes late to the high elevations found in Grand Teton National Park. The park is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem, which is the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States. From the sheltered river bottoms, to the sage flats and mountain canyons, the park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear and moose needed habitat to ensure their survival...

 

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Tetons & Snake

One of the most impressive views in the park come from floating down the Snake River where it seems like the . The sheltered river bottoms over many species of wildlife much needed habitat to ensure their survival.

 

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Tetons and Lupine

First light illuminates the Tetons and a field of lupines. Spring comes late to the high elevations found in Grand Teton National Park. The park is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem, which is the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States. From the sheltered river bottoms, to the sage flats and mountain canyons, the park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear and moose needed habitat to ensure their survival...

 

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The Watering Hole

This traveling herd of bison stop for a much needed drink of water from a body of water that happens to be a picture postcard backdrop featuring the Grand Tetons. Bison herds such as these are found in Grand Teton National Park and add to the beauty and natural splendor of the Park.

 

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View from the Lodge

This spectacular view of the Grand Teton range can be seen from the Grand Teton Lodge in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. There are many spectacular views of nature found within the Park. Many visitors stay at the lodge for this postcard view.

 

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Waiting On A Friend

A Sandhill Crane uses a slough along the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park to raise their young in safety. These areas offer critical habitat for many species of waterfowl & shorebirds.

 

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Winter Barn

Snow covers this old barn that attracts many visitors during the year in Grand Teton National Park. The park is part of the Yellowstone ecosystem, which is the largest intact natural area in the contiguous United States. From the sheltered river bottoms, to the sage flats and mountain canyons, Grand Teton National Park offers wildlife such as sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, grizzly bear and moose needed habitat to ensure their survival.

 

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Yellowstone Falls

The lower falls on the Yellowstone River fall 308 feet to start the beginning of Yellowstone Canyon — one of the great attractions in Yellowstone National Park. The canyon offers critical habitat to wildlife, such as trout, osprey and bald eagles.

 

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